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Cultural and Heritage Resource Management

Advising, Plans of Study & Courses

Advising | MPS Plan | GC Plan | Courses | Objectives

Academic Director & Advising

Mentoring and advisement is an essential part of the program. Students meet with faculty and the program director to ensure that educational goals are being met. Current and prospective students should contact the program at chrm@umd.edu.

Plan of Study: Master of Professional Studies

Offered mostly online, the Master of Professional Studies in Cultural Heritage Resource Management (MPS-CHRM) is a 36-credit multi-disciplinary curriculum. The MPS-CHRM may be completed in 18 months of full-time enrollment by taking 6 credits over the course of six 12-week terms. CHRM uses the 12-week term format wherein students complete course work in 11 weeks with week 12 reserved for finals. (see Calendars & Deadlines). Full-time and part-time enrollment is welcomed.

The MPS-CHRM’s plan of study includes eight 3-credit courses which focus on research methods, ethics, communication, management, technical writing, and critical thinking skills (24 credits); one internship/practicum course (6 credits); and one thesis course (6 credits).

  • The internship/practicum is designed to contribute to the students’ understanding of the overall process of CHRM. Students who are already working in CHRM may use their employment as their practicum if the opportunity is available for them to learn beyond the confines of their job.
  • For the thesis, students write a technical report relating on a CHRM research topic. The thesis will include a statement of purpose or hypothesis to be examined, a research design developed specifically for the student’s research, a broad literature review to place the research in context, original data collection and analysis, summary and discussion of results, and a conclusion. The thesis may be based on field, lab, collections, or literature analysis or any combination thereof. An oral presentation is required, but a written comprehensive exam is not required.
MPS-CHRM: Plan of Study
Course Title Credits Year Offered
CHRM*** Introduction to Cultural and Heritage Resource Management 3 1 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Vital Technologies: Methods, Applications, and Interpretation 3 1 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Community Engagement: Cultural Communication, Sensitivity, Tribal Consultation, and Public Outreach 3 1 Term II (Winter)
CHRM*** From Collecting to Collections: Data Management and Preservation of Cultural Materials 3 1 Term II (Winter)
CHRM*** International Preservation Laws and Professional Ethics 3 1 Term III (Spring)
CHRM*** Applied Archaeological Theory: From Plan of Work to Final Report, Establishing Significance 3 1 Term III (Spring)
CHRM*** Internship/Practicum 6 1 Term IV (Summer)
CHRM*** Business of CHRM: Leadership, Project, and People Management 3 2 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Project Management: Critical Thinking, Research, and Technical Writing 3 2 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Thesis 6 2 Term II (Winter)

Plan of Study: Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in in Cultural and Heritage Resource Management (GC-CHRM) offers an 18-credit mostly online curriculum which may be completed in 9 months of full-time study by taking six credits over three 12-week terms. CHRM uses the 12-week term format wherein students complete course work in 11 weeks with week 12 reserved for finals. (See Calendars & Deadlines). Full-time and part-time enrollment is welcomed.

The GC-CHRM’s plan of study includes four 3-credit courses with an emphasis on professional development, ethics, and writing as well as professional communication, critical thinking, and career options (12 credits) and one internship/practicum course (6 credits). The internship/practicum is designed to contribute to the students’ understanding of the overall process of CHRM. Students who are already working in CHRM may use their employment as their practicum if the opportunity is available for them to learn beyond the confines of their job.

GC-CHRM: Plan of Study
Course Title Credits Offered
CHRM*** Introduction to Cultural and Heritage Resource Management 3 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Vital Technologies: Methods, Applications, and Interpretation 3 Term I (Fall)
CHRM*** Community Engagement: Cultural Communication, Sensitivity, Tribal Consultation, and Public Outreach 3 Term II (Winter)
CHRM*** From Collecting to Collections: Data Management and Preservation of Cultural Materials 3 Term II (Winter)
CHRM*** Internship/Practicum 6 Term III (Sprint)

Course Descriptions

CHRMXXX: Introduction to Cultural and Heritage Resource Management (3 credits). This course provides the introductory background to the field of cultural and heritage resource management. It examines existing international, national, and local frameworks for the protection of cultural heritage. It provides an overview of employment opportunities and ethical responsibilities within the profession. Materials are presented through lectures, interactive learning modules and independent and team research.

CHRMXXX: Applied Archaeological Theory: From Plan of Work to Final Report, Establishing Significance (3 credits). In this course, students learn how archaeological theory is used to build a plan of work that lays the groundwork for field research, identification, planning, laboratory analysis, and evaluating project results with the ultimate goal of being able to establish significance according to the Criteria considerations established under the National Historic Preservation Act for property significance in relation to the National Register of Historic Places. The course also touches upon historic properties management for preservation planning.

CHRMXXX: Vital Technologies: Methods, Applications, and Interpretation (3 credits). This course examines the range of nondestructive technologies used to research and image cultural and heritage resources. The course will cover standard archaeological survey methods and will focus on remote sensing technologies and how an integrated approach to archaeological investigation can reveal vital information for resource planning, interpretation, and outreach. Students will learn how a research design is developed, data are captured, integrated and interpreted and how they can be used in CHRM research and resource stewardship.

CHRMXXX: Community Engagement: Cultural Communication, Sensitivity, Tribal Consultation, and Public Outreach (3 credits). This course provides students with grounding in cultural communication and sensitivity to community, cultural, and stakeholder needs within and beyond project specific confines. Using the broader context of practicing anthropology in the exploration of communication styles, learning styles, and cultural biases and taboos, students are exposed to underlying concepts concerning inter-cultural communication so that they may develop more collaborative approaches to research. The program also provides background in the development of public outreach programs in the context of CHRM.

CHRMXXX: From Collecting to Collections: Data Management and Preservation of Cultural Materials (3 credits). This course begins with an overview of archaeological curation and collections management followed by content relating to the process of collecting cultural materials and samples with the goal of obtaining as much information during analysis as possible. It also provides information on the preservation of cultural materials from the time they leave the field until they are placed in a certified collections facility.

CHRMXXX: International Preservation Laws and Professional Ethics (3 credits). The course examines existing international, national, and local legislation as well as the professional ethics that create the frameworks for the protection and preservation of cultural and heritage resources. It looks at the ethical practice of the business of CHRM beyond the legal requirements. In this course, students create a resource reference of applicable legislation that familiarizes them with legislation and then they undertake an in-depth examination of the most applicable legislation driving CHRM in their region.

CHRMXXX: Business of CHRM: Leadership, Project, and People Management (3 credits). The Business of CHRM begins with an introduction on the heritage and environment industry, followed by learning modules on finance, accounting, marketing, sales, operations, business models and plans, human resources management, structure and governance, records management, and international CHRM. The course also provides students with introductory conflict management and negotiation skills.

CHRMXXX: Project Management: Critical Thinking, Research, and Technical Writing (3 credits). The Project Management course is the capstone class for the program, providing students with a grounding in the critical thinking processes necessary during each stage of the CHRM process. It provides students with insights into the processes used as research questions are translated into data and then into an evaluative report. Students review examples of appropriate and inappropriate technical reports and then analyze the reports to understand the thinking processes necessary for project management to provide the client with the documentation necessary for completing the compliance process.

CHRMXXX: Cultural and Heritage Resource Management (CHRM) Internship (6 credits). A 6-week internship/practicum that would contribute to students' understanding of the overall process of CHRM. Students who are already working in CHRM may use their employment as their practicum if the opportunity is available for them to learn beyond the confines of their job.

CHRMXXX: Cultural and Heritage Resource Management (CHRM) Thesis (6 credits). A technical report relating on a CHRM research topic. The thesis will include a statement of purpose or hypothesis to be examined, a research design developed specifically for the student’s research, a broad literature review to place the research in context, original data collection and analysis, summary and discussion of results, and a conclusion. The thesis may be based on field, lab, collections, or literature analysis or any combination thereof. An oral presentation is required, but a written comprehensive exam is not required.

Program Objectives

Graduate Programs in Cultural and Heritage Resource Management helps with the acquisition and fulfillment of key competencies to build the knowledge and skills necessary to advance. Through the graduate certificate, students acquire knowledge of the Principles of Cultural Heritage Law, Use of budgets in Cultural and Heritage Resource Management, Documentation needed during phase I, II, III of Cultural and Heritage Resource Management projects, Basic Native American/Indigenous people sensitivity, North American archaeology artifact identification, Safety training, Final report writing, Understanding of state agencies schedules, Outdoor life sense, Map reading and orienteering, Professional conduct and ethics, Note taking and interpretation, Soils and stratigraphy, Context and functional identification and recording, and Above ground resource recognition.

In addition to the educational objectives for the Graduate Certificate, students in the Master of Professional Studies in Cultural and Heritage Resource Management will be instructed in the knowledge and skills necessary to earn employment and succeed in management-level positions in Cultural and Heritage Resource Management including: Federal, state and tribal regulations including Section 106 and NEPA legislation; NAGPRA, NRHP legislation; Agreement documents, permitting; Local ordinances, local land management, oversight agencies; Advocacy, tribal consultation; Proposal writing, scheduling, marketing, project logistics, personnel management; Establishing site significance, data management, work plans, mitigation measures; Contracting, accounting, budget development; Crew management principles; Cultural communication; and Public outreach.

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