Educating the Next Generation

Graduate Studies in Interpreting and Translation

Course Descriptions

COMM 606: Seminar in Communication Management, 3 credits. Communication and public relations as a managed function of organizations are introduced. Students learn how managing communication contributes to organizational effectiveness. Using organizational theory, theories of Excellence in public relations and communication management, communication metrics and communication ethics, students build their communication strategic management skills beyond the programmatic level to the functional and organizational levels of decision-making.

COMM 609: Fundamentals of Interpreting, 2 to 6 credits. Develops a systematic, reflective approach to interpreting tasks in real-world settings and outlines the use of different modes of interpreting under professional working conditions. Provides an overview of interpreting skills with exercises to develop them, including focus on active listening and analysis, effective use of memory, and delivery of the target message. Interpreting strategies and techniques in both dialogue and formal consecutive settings are discussed in a range of interpreting domains and practiced in the context of authentic exercises, enabling the development of strategies to identify, analyze and resolve difficulties and challenges in professional practice contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication strategies and the need to focus on underlying meaning in order to convey the speaker's message and intent. The support role of note-taking in formal consecutive is introduced, and guidance is provided on developing a personal system. Good public speaking skills for the interpreter are identified, discussed, and practiced during interpreting exercises, emphasizing clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Sight translation exercises introduce strategies for working from the written to the spoken word in domain-specific settings, to address vocabulary and structural challenges to be resolved both with and without preparation. Introduces concepts of quality assessment based upon correspondence of meaning in the source and target messages, language use, and style of delivery for the intended audience. Constructive feedback is practiced through exercises involving instructor and peer critique. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of recordings of interpretation and sight translation work, commented transcripts, and reflective statements documenting the development of interpreting skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made throughout the course.

COMM 610: Introduction to Translation and Interpreting Studies, 3 credits. Provides an overview of the interdisciplinary fields of Translation and Interpreting Studies and establishes relationships between the scholarly study of translation and interpreting phenomena and the professional practice of the translator and interpreter. The theoretical developments of these fields are outlined through lectures, readings and discussions, and major theories and concepts of each field are introduced. Research purposes in translation and interpreting studies are discussed with the aim of situating the translation and interpreting work of the individual in a broader community of reflective practitioners aware of the history and development of the profession. We examine how these theories and concepts can inform our practice, guide us to a higher level of competence, and address issues of interlingual, intercultural mediation in authentic, real-world settings both past and present.

COMM 619: Consecutive Interpretation, 2 to 6 credits. Builds upon the systematic, reflective approach to interpreting in real-world settings introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting. Consecutive interpreting skills are consolidated through individual and group practice, and any remaining challenges related to consecutive interpreting sub-skills are identified and addressed. The ability to perceive essential meaning is reinforced, as note-taking skills are refined. We expand our active vocabulary, as exercises grounded in authentic, domain-specific settings are prepared and completed. Practice continues to cover dialogue interpreting, albeit with increasingly complex material. Emphasis on formal consecutive interpretation of longer passages grows as interpreting processes become increasingly automatic. Voice work for the interpreter is introduced, with stress on habits allowing the effective use of the voice throughout the career of the interpreter. Continued work on sight translation supports the internalization of strategies that enable interpretation with greater fluency and ease when referring to the written word, laying a foundation for a future introduction to simultaneous interpreting with text. Student performance is discussed based upon concepts of quality assessment introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting. Constructive feedback is practiced through exercises involving peer critique. Prepares participants for the M.A. entrance test. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of recordings of interpretation and sight translation work, commented transcripts, and reflective statements documenting the development of interpreting skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made throughout the course.

COMM 629: Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation, 1 credit. Builds upon the discussion of the simultaneous mode and exercises introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting by reviewing the relationship between consecutive and simultaneous skills and introducing work in the booth in a series of progressive exercises. Challenges of simultaneous interpreting, including split attention, ear-voice span, and voice and microphone technique are identified and addressed in context. Participants become familiar with the booth setting and exercises required to build simultaneous skills while working with material at the introductory level of the Fundamentals of Interpreting course. Recommended as preparation for the M.A. entrance examination.

COMM 637: Professional Practice Forum in Translation: Career Portfolio and Exams, 1 credit. Serves as final preparation for entry into the profession at a distinguished level through development of career portfolio to meet summative degree requirement and development of strategies for gaining work as a professional translator. Prepares participants for degree examinations and employer tests through the review of previous exam material and employer testing requirements. Serves as venue for degree examinations, career goal setting and planning for future employment. Participants present and defend career portfolio as summative requirement for degree. You will develop and defend a comprehensive professional practice portfolio consisting of degree examinations, a summative reflective statement, materials from course portfolios, a research paper completed in another course, and a strategic plan to identify, prepare and apply for work with specific employers of translation services.

COMM 639: Fundamentals of Translation, 2 to 6 credits. Develops a systematic, reflective approach to translation involving both the written and spoken word. Provides an overview of domains of translation, associated text categories and translation tasks. Develops strategies to identify, analyze and resolve translation challenges in specific, authentic, real-world contexts. Working with a series of current texts, we explore general concepts such as structural analysis, text typology, and language usage and register, as well as language-specific translation strategies grounded in comparative stylistics. We work through all stages of the translation process from receiving the translation brief, conducting analysis and research, to producing first drafts and final versions resulting in polished copy. Sight translation exercises introduce strategies for working from the written to the spoken word in domain-specific settings, to address vocabulary and structural challenges to be resolved both with and without preparation. Develops awareness of translation resources and tools required for high levels of productivity in the translator's workplace. Introduces concepts of translation quality assessment based upon text type, purpose, and intended audience, as well as approaches to providing constructive editorial feedback through exercises involving instructor and peer critique. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of written translations, recordings of sight translation work, and reflective statements documenting the development of translation skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made in translation processes undertaken to complete draft and polished versions of assignments throughout the course.

COMM 641: Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation, 1 credit. Introduces the use of computer-assisted translation tools to support large-scale translation projects and streamline translation processes. Focuses on industry software products that utilize translation memory and terminology management systems. Discusses the role of tools in the entire translation process from pre- to post-editing.

COMM 649: Translation for Specific Domains, 2 to 6 credits. Builds upon the systematic, reflective approach to translation introduced in Fundamentals of Translation by addressing the development of translation skills required for specialization in specific domains. In written and sight translation exercises, we develop approaches to researching specialized subject material, such as locating and assessing source and target language resources, developing and maintaining domain-specific terminology, and consulting experts in the field. We complete authentic, real-world translation tasks and projects. We learn to work in a translation team and are introduced to computer-assisted translation tools that enable the completion of large-scale projects. Continued work on sight translation supports the internalization of translation strategies that enable us to achieve higher levels of productivity and accomplish translation tasks under time constraints. Prepares students for M.A. entrance examination. You will develop a portfolio consisting of written translations, recordings of sight translation work, and reflective statements documenting the development of translation skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made in translation processes undertaken to complete draft and polished versions of assignments throughout the course.

COMM 657: Professional Practice Forum in Interpreting: Career Portfolio and Exams, 1 credit. Serves as final preparation for entry into the profession at a distinguished level through development of career portfolio to meet summative degree requirement and development of strategies for gaining work as a professional interpreter. Prepares participants for degree examinations and employer tests through the review of previous exam material and employer testing requirements. Serves as venue for degree examinations, career goal setting and planning for future employment. Participants present and defend career portfolio as summative requirement for degree. You will develop and defend a comprehensive professional practice portfolio consisting of degree examinations, a summative reflective statement, materials from course portfolios, a research paper completed in another course, and a strategic plan to identify, prepare and apply for work with specific employers of interpretation services.

COMM 659: Translation for Language-Specific Markets, 1 to 3 credits. Builds upon the systematic, reflective approach to translation introduced in Fundamentals of Translation by addressing the development of translation skills required for specialization in specific domains. In written and sight translation exercises, we develop approaches to researching specialized subject material, such as locating and assessing source and target language resources, developing and maintaining domain-specific terminology, and consulting experts in the field. We complete authentic, real-world translation tasks and projects. We learn to work in a translation team and are introduced to computer-assisted translation tools that enable the completion of large-scale projects. Continued work on sight translation supports the internalization of translation strategies that enable us to achieve higher levels of productivity and accomplish translation tasks under time constraints. Prepares students for M.A. entrance examination. You will develop a portfolio consisting of written translations, recordings of sight translation work, and reflective statements documenting the development of translation skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made in translation processes undertaken to complete draft and polished versions of assignments throughout the course.

COMM 669: Professional Practice Forum in Translation: Practicum, 1 to 3 credits. Provides opportunities to complete real-world translation projects on campus and in the public service, legal, business, and political communities as translators, project managers and translators/reviewers working on group projects. Collaboration with participants in the interpreting practicum is also sought to prepare multilingual texts for practicum events and familiarize participants with conference translation. Complements Translation for Specific Markets, and practicum projects are included in course and career reflective practice portfolios. Requires independent study plan agreed with course instructor.

COMM 670: Seminar in Listening, 3 credits. A study of research in and measurement of listening behavior.

COMM 679: Professional Practice Forum in Translation: Workplace Processes and Procedures, 1 credit. Provides in-depth exploration of processes and procedures in public service, legal, and political settings where multilingual translation services are commonplace. Prepares for translation in real-world settings by discussing aspects of work that are not directly related to procedural skill building but are essential for a successful career in translation, including familiarization with translation procedures across sectors and institutions, enabling students to make informed career plans and choices. Ethics and professional conduct are discussed as well as business practices for freelance translators working as sole proprietors. Empowers participants by helping to establish and reinforce identity as a professional translator, develop specializations, and pursue professional and career development opportunities through interaction with members of the profession, professional organizations, and institutions in the language industry.

COMM 683 Intercultural Communication Theory, 3 credits. An in-depth coverage of the essential theories of intercultural communication is provided.

COMM 688: Communication Field Experience, 1 to 6 credits. Applications of communication principles and research in professional communication settings.

COMM 710: Translation and Localization Project Management, 3 credits. Introduces basic principles of project management in the translation industry based upon globalization and localization processes for software, websites, and other translation-driven products. Focuses on information technology and workflow in large-scale multilingual projects. Examines planning, execution, and evaluation processes grounded in best practices and standards of the translation and localization industry.

COMM 713: Translation Technology, 3 credits. Builds upon the principles outlined in Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation to develop comprehensive knowledge of the current and future roles of technology in translation processes involving both the spoken and the written word, including use of widely available software tools and systems for terminology management, translation memory, and machine translation. Students carry out projects using translation technology, enabling them to apply newly acquired knowledge in applied contexts. Examination of case studies highlights how translation technology is leveraged across public and private sector organizations and the latest developments in the field.

COMM 719: Advanced Consecutive Interpretation, 2 to 6 credits. Builds consecutive interpreting skills to a highly professional level by sharpening listening, processing, memory, note-taking, and delivery skills, enabling you to interpret highly complex material requiring particular attention to nuance, tone, and style. Through instructor and peer feedback, you will enhance your overall understanding of factors influencing your skill development in consecutive interpretation and develop appropriate practice strategies. You will develop the concentration ability required to interpret extended passages of up to ten minutes and long exchanges of up to 20 minutes accurately and completely, while maintaining appropriate style, register, and delivery. Exercises include dialogue (conversation, interview) and monologue (speeches) settings. Subject matter and terminology preparation skills are enhanced through the preparation of specialized topics and glossaries. Student performance is discussed based upon concepts of quality assessment introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting. Constructive feedback is practiced through exercises involving peer critique. Participants emerge from the course as reflective practitioners with the consecutive interpreting skills required to perform competently in real-world settings. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of recordings of interpretation, commented transcripts, study material such as terminological glossaries, and reflective statements documenting the development of interpreting skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made throughout the course.

COMM 729: Simultaneous Interpretation, 1 to 3 credits. Builds upon the discussion of the simultaneous mode and exercises introduced in Introduction to Simultaneous Interpreting by reviewing the relationship between consecutive and simultaneous skills and introducing work in the booth in a series of progressive exercises. Challenges of simultaneous interpreting, including split attention, ear-voice span, and voice and microphone technique are identified and addressed in context. Simultaneous interpreting skills are consolidated through individual and group practice, sharpening listening, processing, memory, and delivery skills. Through instructor and peer feedback, you will begin to understand the factors influencing your skill development in simultaneous interpretation and develop appropriate practice strategies. You will develop the concentration ability required to interpret passages of up 15 minutes accurately and completely, while maintaining appropriate style, register, and delivery. Guiding principles of collegial teamwork and microphone technique are introduced and reinforced in the booth. Subject matter and terminology preparation skills are enhanced through the preparation of topics, glossaries, and written speeches. Student performance is discussed based upon concepts of quality assessment introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting. Constructive feedback is practiced through exercises involving peer critique. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of recordings of interpretation, commented transcripts, study material such as terminological glossaries, and reflective statements documenting the development of interpreting skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made throughout the course.

COMM 730 Seminar in Health Communication, 3 credits. Communication processes in health care and promotion. Formerly: SPCH730.

COMM 749: Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation, 1 to 3 credits. Builds simultaneous interpreting skills to a highly professional level by sharpening listening, processing, memory, and delivery skills, enabling you to interpret highly complex material requiring particular attention to nuance, tone, and style. Introduces simultaneous interpretation with text. Through instructor and peer feedback, you will enhance your overall understanding of factors influencing your skill development in simultaneous interpretation with and without text and develop appropriate practice strategies. You will develop the concentration ability required to interpret extended passages of up 30 minutes accurately and completely, while maintaining appropriate style, register, and delivery. Particular attention is paid to teamwork and microphone technique in the booth. Subject matter and terminology preparation skills are enhanced through the preparation of specialized topics, glossaries, and written speeches. Student performance is discussed based upon concepts of quality assessment introduced in Fundamentals of Interpreting. Constructive feedback is practiced through exercises involving peer critique. Participants emerge from the course as reflective practitioners with the simultaneous interpreting skills required to perform competently in real-world settings. You will develop a reflective practice portfolio consisting of recordings of interpretation, commented transcripts, study material such as terminological glossaries, and reflective statements documenting the development of interpreting skills and demonstrating awareness of progress made throughout the course.

COMM 759: Professional Practice Forum in Interpreting: Practicum, 1 to 3 credits. Provides opportunities to interpret consecutively and simultaneously in real-world settings on campus and in the public service, legal, business, and political communities. Team leader skills are introduced, practiced, and discussed in authentic contexts. Participants also apply their knowledge by organizing and convening an event or series of events (conference, debate, or negotiation), selecting topics and delegates, and preparing speeches and arguments to deliver and interpret. Collaboration with participants in M.A. translation courses is sought. Complements Advanced Consecutive and Advanced Simultaneous courses, and experiences from interpreted events are included in course and career reflective practice portfolios. Requires independent study plan agreed with course instructor.

COMM 762 The Rhetoric of Political Institutions, 3 credits. The role of discourse in major political institutions is examined. The specific institutional focus may change from instructor to instructor. Examples include Congress, the courts, or the state legislatures.

COMM 769: Professional Practice Forum in Interpreting: Workplace Processes and Procedures, 1 to 2 credits. Provides in-depth exploration of processes and procedures in public service, legal, and political settings where interpreting services are commonplace. Prepares for interpreting in real-world settings by discussing aspects of work that are not directly related to procedural skill building but are essential for a successful career in interpreting, including familiarization with interpreting procedures across sectors and institutions, enabling students to make informed career plans and choices. Ethics and professional conduct are discussed as well as business practices for freelance interpreters working as sole proprietors. Empowers participants by helping to establish and reinforce identity as a professional interpreter, develop specializations, and pursue professional and career development opportunities through interaction with members of the profession, professional organizations, and institutions in the language industry.

COMM 789: Special Topics: Advanced Health Communication, 3 credits

COMM 789: Special Topics: Advanced Intercultural Communication/Negotiations, 3 credits

COMM 789: Special Topics: Advanced Political and Legal Communication, 3 credits

COMM 798: Independent Study: Public Speaking, 1 to 3 credits

COMM 798: Independent Study: Intensive Writing in English, 1 to 3 credits

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