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Course List


College of Behavioral and Social Sciences


  • CCJS105 course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: This course has 100% synchronous instruction.
  • CCJS105 course syllabus

Discover the world of Criminology. This course examines criminal behavior and the methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, correction and incapacitation; and the prevention of crime.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

  • GEOG172 online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: This course has 100% synchronous instruction.
  • GEOG172 course syllabus

Earth observations from space enable the mapping and monitoring of our changing planet. This survey course reviews current observational capabilities and examines scientific applications in quantifying global environmental change. Drivers and outcomes of key dynamics will be illustrated and discussed, including sea and continental ice loss, deforestation, ocean warming, urbanization, agricultural expansion and intensification, and vegetation response to climate change.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

  • MLAW298M online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: This course has 100% synchronous instruction.
  • MLAW298M course syllabus (Coming soon)

Experience the excitement and reward of arguing, and perhaps winning your client's case in court! Mock Trial is designed to introduce students to the key principles of trial advocacy through a “learn by doing” approach to instruction. While classes will include explanatory lectures, the emphasis will be on learning through student exercises and by students observing and analyzing the performances of others.

While no one should expect to leave this class as a polished advocate ready for trial, everyone can expect to leave with a greater understanding of litigation tactics and courtroom performance. Irrespective of initial skill levels, students will leave this class with greater confidence in public speaking and advocacy. Should you apply and be admitted to the University of Maryland, College Park as a degree-seeking student, this course will also prepare you to join the national champion UMD Mock Trial team when you enroll.

Recording: Due to course content, MLAW298M- Mock Trial requires students to use their webcam at all times, even while recording. In addition, online synchronous course meetings may be recorded. When sessions are being recorded the instructor will verbally announce the recording. Recorded material will be accessible to and only used by students enrolled in that course via the course's secure ELMS page. Recorded material is designed to assist students with studying and accessibility and disability accommodation.

Technical Requirements

  • The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.
  • In addition, students registered in this course will need a way to transmit video. Cameras built into computer monitors are sufficient. For students that do not have a built-in camera on their computer, a web-cam attachment will be needed.
  • PSYC221 online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: The course has both synchronous (75%) and asynchronous (25%) instruction. For the asynchronous portion, students access course material and complete assignments on their own.
  • PSYC221 course syllabus

This course looks closely at the influence of social factors on the individual and on interpersonal behavior. Topics such as conformity, attitude change, person perception, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior will be discussed. Students in this class will study the psychology of persons and their relationships with others and with groups and with society as a whole. This class will also look at macrosocial phenomena (e.g. social class) as they relate to the attitudes and behavior of individuals. Of special concern to psychological sociologists is how to explain a variety of demographic, social, and cultural facts in terms of human social interaction. Some of the major topics in this field are social inequality, group dynamics, social change, socialization, and social identity.

Course supplies: This course utilizes TurningPoint for student polling. To participate in a TurningPoint web poll, students must have a TurningPoint account. In addition, students must install the TurningPoint app on their mobile device or log in to TTPoll on a web-enabled device. Students enter the Session ID provided by their instructor. For assistance with TurningPoint registration, contact UMD’s Division of Information Technology at 301-405-1500 or itsupport@umd.edu. Students must provide their full name and UID. This is done after students have completed the Confirmation of Admission Process but before the start of the course.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

  • PSYC354 online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: The course has both synchronous (75%) and asynchronous (25%) instruction. For the asynchronous portion, students access course material and complete assignments on their own.
  • PSYC354 course syllabus

What are the psychological implications of racism, sexism, homophobia, and other structures of inequality in the United States? How do socio-cultural privilege and oppression influence individual and group thoughts, feelings, and behaviors? This course will take a current events focus to understanding multicultural and social justice issues in psychology with an emphasis on self-reflection, mental health, cross-cultural communication, and strategies for social change.

Course supplies: This course utilizes TurningPoint for student polling. To participate in a TurningPoint web poll, students must have a TurningPoint account. In addition, students must install the TurningPoint app on their mobile device or log in to TTPoll on a web-enabled device. Students enter the Session ID provided by their instructor. For assistance with TurningPoint registration, contact UMD’s Division of Information Technology at 301-405-1500 or itsupport@umd.edu. Students must provide their full name and UID. This is done after students have completed the Confirmation of Admission Process but before the start of the course.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences


What causes disease? How do we diagnose and treat disease? This course explores human biological systems, functions, and issues such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and neurological disorders. In addition, students explore the genetic, infectious and environmental causes of disease, and learn how various research laboratories on campus use modern scientific techniques to unravel these mysteries. The program incorporates a variety of laboratory and active learning activities. Students also explore the general principles of science.

Course Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed (or be currently enrolled in with anticipated successful completion of) high school biology before enrolling in this course.

College of Education


  • HESI318E online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: The course has both synchronous (50%) and asynchronous (50%) instruction. For the asynchronous portion, students access course material and complete assignments on their own.
  • HESI318E sample course syllabus

This course offers students the opportunity to explore the strengths and values of individuals and teams to better understand how to engage in effective, collaborative leadership. Tools such as the Gallup Organization's CliftonStrengths Assessment will be used with a critical lens. Themes of teamwork, problem-solving, diversity and inclusion, coaching others, and conflict resolution are woven throughout the course. Through engaging in this course, students will: 1) Understand leadership as a relational, process-based phenomenon, beyond person-centric conceptions; 2) Explore personal and group strengths and values and how these influence our understanding and practice of leadership.; 3) Practice effective collaboration and dialogue with diverse others, and; 4) Explore the purpose of leadership as making positive change in organizations and communities. This is a seminar-style online course with both synchronous (live class meetings) and asynchronous (outside of class) components. 

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

  • EDHD231 online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: The course has both synchronous (50%) and asynchronous (50%) instruction. For the asynchronous portion, students access course material and complete assignments on their own.
  • EDHD231 sample course syllabus

Einstein said, "Imagination is more important than knowledge." That’s a fun quote, but we have a hard enough time working our way through the scripted, common-sense parts of everyday life. Some days it feels like no additional input is required of us in order to function in society. However, we humans perform astounding feats of creativity every day. Some of us might even consider life to be unbearable without a touch of creative expression woven throughout. So who are we without innovation and adaptation to a world that constantly demands it?

Our Creativity Quest: Creativity in the 21st-century might look much like it did in previous eras but there is so much to consider NOW. Have our definitions changed? Have the allowances, affordances, and challenges shifted? Who gets a say when deciding what is creative or how to teach creative endeavors? Who decides how much the opportunities, archives, and products that result from our creativity are worth?

Sometimes the value that results from the creative process is priceless and - yet - too often creativity goes unnoticed. It gets discounted and discouraged. It can even be punished at times in our education, work, and life. We will discover some nuances of these challenges. We will attempt each day to unlock mechanisms of the creative mind. More specifically, we will explore the psychological, social, sociological, developmental, cultural, educational, genetic and neural based roots of creativity by looking at what is actually supported by research. We will compare empirical findings to what we already believe and - who knows? - we might even find some yet-to-be discovered truths about creativity in the 21st-century.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

Merrill College of Journalism


  • JOUR267 online synchronous course meeting times (Coming soon)
    • Note: The course has both synchronous (50%) and asynchronous (50%) instruction. For the asynchronous portion, students access course material and complete assignments on their own.
  • JOUR267 sample course syllabus

This course provides students with an overview of how journalists use social media to gather information, tell stories and reach their target audience. Students will develop skills in social content creation, audience engagement, and sourcing and verification.

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

Undergraduate Studies, Honors College


Social Media Analytics is a course for students who are simultaneously interested in social media, data, and the robust analysis of digital media. While interacting online, we navigate a near-endless sea of data in a variety of forms—textual, audiovisual, demographic, biometric, and more. This data is a window into human life, but making sense of it is a task that requires both competence and creativity. In this course, we will imagine and explore different computational tools and methods for capturing, aggregating, organizing, and analyzing social media data to better understand phenomena such as consumer habits, interpersonal conflict, social movement(s), community formation and disruption, language evolution and adaptation, political argument, and societal change.

We will begin with critical concepts, frameworks, and theories that help us better grasp the roles social media play in our lives, focusing especially on its impacts on marginalized and vulnerable groups. These vocabularies will equip us to think creatively, ethically, and responsibly as we investigate computational tools and methods for handling social media material, including qualitative data analysis software, extensible markup language, and databasing. Students will pursue research questions of their design, driven by their own interests, to practice social media analytics and position themselves as digital makers, too, with the potential to make creative, significant interventions in the communities they care about. We will explore how personal, historical, and sociopolitical culture is inextricably entwined with what we do and see online. 

Designed broadly for all majors and interests, this course aims to equip students with an analytical skillset that can be translated across multiple fields, including information science, computer science and engineering, marketing, political science, public policy, cultural studies, communication, and entrepreneurship. "

Technical Requirements: The virtual classroom is a dynamic space. To confirm that you have the necessary technology to be successful in this online course, see TYS-Online Technical Requirements.

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