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Course Descriptions


GVPT604. Introduction to War and Armed Conflict in World Politics, (3 Credits).
This seminar examines major theories of both international and civil wars and reviews major empirical studies that test theories of conflict. The topics include the onset of armed conflict, the duration and outcomes of wars, and the durability of peace in the aftermath of wars. The focus is on developing an understanding of central debates in the literature and primary empirical findings from quantitative and cross-national analyses.

GVPT605. Introduction to Conflict and Cooperation in the World Economy, (3 Credits).
This seminar examines major theoretical approaches and empirical studies of international political economy, contemporary dynamics of globalization, the role of domestic politics in the formation of foreign economic policies of states, the dynamics of international trade and investment disputes, and role of international institutions in multi-lateral governance of the world economy. The focus is on developing an understanding of central debates in the literature and primary empirical findings from quantitative and cross-national analyses.

GVPT606.  Introduction to International Law and Institutions, (3 Credits).
This seminar examines major theoretical approaches and empirical studies of international law and institutions relating to international political economy and international security. Topics to be covered include the sources of international law and the development of core legal principles in the post-WWII ear, the role of international economic institutions such as WTO, IMF, and World Bank in the global economy, and the influence of international institutions such as the UN Security Council, World Court, and International Criminal Court in addressing international security issues. Larger questions about the effectiveness of the WTO, Laws of War, and International Human Rights Law will be considered. The focus is on developing an understanding of central debates in the literature and primary empirical findings from quantitative and cross-national analyses.

GVPT622.  Quantitative Methods of Political Science, (3 Credits).
This course will focus on statistical methods of data analysis that are commonly used in the study of international relations. Regression analysis of observational data will be given primary attention as well as problems of casual inference with observational data and how to address them. The course will conclude with discussion of recent work in IR using experimental designs and data analysis.

GVPT708.  Seminar in International Relations Theory, (3 Credits).
This course will focus on central theoretical and analytical approaches to understanding how domestic and international factors influence and shape both the foreign policy goals pursued by national leaders and how these same factors affect the ability of such leaders to achieve their foreign policy goals. Theoretical approaches to studying international political economy, international security, and international law and institutions will be emphasized.

GVPT729.  Quantitative Analyses of International Political Economy and International Security, (3 Credits).
This seminar will examine major data sets that are widely used in the study of international political economy and international security and cutting-edge quantitative analyses utilizing these data sets. Attention will be given to the strengths and weakness of these data sets and quantitative studies and their utility in addressing central topics in the study of international political economy and international security.

GVPT761.  International Political Economy, (3 Credits).
This course examines central theoretical and empirical studies of international trade, finance, and investment as well as topics such as MNC relations with host countries, the relationship of domestic politics to foreign economic policy, patterns of globalization, and key legal principles relating to IPE. Throughout the course emphasis will be given to the importance of political and strategic factors in shaping and influencing international economics.

GVPT803.  Seminar in International Political Organizations, (3 Credits).
This seminar examines some of the most important international economic institutions in the global economy such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the World Trade Organization, and regional development and investment banks. In addition, key security institutions such as the UN Security Council, regional security organizations, and the International Criminal Court will be examined. Key issues regarding political influences on behavior and effectiveness of international institutions are considered as well as challenges facing each organization, including possible major reforms.

GVPT808.  The Impact of International Economics and Security on Developing Countries, (3 Credits).
This seminar examines the challenges of economic and political development facing many countries in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia with particular attention to how international economic and security conditions affect national economic development, democratization, and political stability. Topics including MNC operations, the challenges of developing strong export markets, globalization and development, reliance on natural resources for development, role of foreign aid in development, and the impact of civil war and international security threats on development.

GVPT879.  The Political Economy of International Power and Security Policy, (3 Credits).
This seminar will focus on the inter-relationships between economic and military power in international relations. Topics to be covered will include the relationship between international trade and investment ties and international conflict, the use of economic sanctions to pressure governments, the relationship of rising and declining economic power for international security, burden sharing in alliances, the political economy of voting behavior in the UN, the consequences of international conflict and war for the economic development and growth of countries, and the consequences of climate change for the international economy and international security.

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